Enterprises are moving applications to the cloud to increase operational agility. However, most of the migrations are lift and shift that don’t really take full advantage of Cloud services. Google Cloud Platform is the first to bring awesome end-to-end experiences for Java application development, from writing with the most popular framework, Spring and Spring Boot, to plugins for Maven, Gradle, Eclipse, and IntelliJ, and to deployment options for PaaS, containers, and more. But this is…

From function source code to running in Kubernetes in 5 minutes. That’s the power some of the latest open source projects can bring to your fingertips. This perceived simplicity actually hides layers of abstractions underneath. In this deep dive, we’ll explore all the technology behind the scenes, from Kubernetes, Istio, Knative, to riff and Spring Cloud function.

Spring Framework and Spring Boot have made huge strides in making it easier than ever to develop the next generation of cloud native applications. Importantly, a number of Spring projects provide cloud-vendor agnostic abstractions to developers so that with a simple configuration switch, you’re able to move your local application to run in an on prem datacenter or in the cloud with managed services.

Ray Tsang from Google contributed a couple of generators for JHipster, including the initial Kubernetes support, Istio support, and Google App Engine support. In this session, we’ll see how to use these generators to quickly create and deploy JHipster applications into these environments. We’ll also look at the latest work being done on thin microservices architecture such that circuit breakers, retries, load balancing and more are delegated to Istio. In App Engine, we’ll see…

Microservices are here to stay. When applied properly, microservices techniques and culture ultimately help us continuously improve business at a faster pace than traditional architecture. However, microservices architecture itself can be complex to configure. All of a sudden, we are faced with the need for a service discovery server, how do we store service metadata, make decisions on whether to use client side load balancing or server side load balancing, deal with network resiliency, think…

Debugging applications in production is like being the detective in a crime movie. Especially with microservices. Especially with containers. Especially in the cloud. Trying to see what’s going on in a production deployment at scale is impossible without proper tools! Google has spent over a decade deploying containerized Java applications at unprecedented scale and the infrastructure and tools developed by Google have made it uniquely possible to manage, troubleshoot, and debug, at scale.

Everyone is talking about containers—but be aware! It takes discipline to use container technology. It may not be as secure nor as optimal as you thought it would be. Although it’s relatively easy to create a new immutable container image to run everywhere, you may have fallen into many of the caveats. Is it running as the root user? Why are the images taking so much space? Why did your containers run out of space in the first place!? Most importantly, your container images may not be as…

gRPC is a high performance, open source, general RPC framework that puts mobile and HTTP/2 first. gRPC is based on many years of Google’s experience in building distributed systems - it is designed to be low latency, bandwidth and CPU efficient, to create massively distributed systems that span data centers, as well as power mobile apps, real-time communications, IoT devices and APIs. It’s also interoperable between multiple languages.

Kubernetes is a powerful, open source, container orchestration / cluster management tool created by Google. It drew upon all the lessons learned from a near-decade of using containers at Google. Kubernetes handles a number of failure scenarios gracefully, from a crashed process, to a failure of a cluster node. We’ll show this through a real Raspberry Pi computing cluster that runs Kubernetes - and play a real-life chaos monkey by pulling the plugs!

A quick overview on Docker containers, usages, and how to scale up from a single container to a fleet of containers working together with Kubernetes for real-life workloads, such as running java-based applications! Join this session to see how to use Kubernetes to launch, manage, and rolling-upgrade a fleet of Java application instances with session replication.